A CITY OF IMMIGRATION: THE MAKING OF PHILADELPHIA

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Since the founding of Philadelphia, immigrants shaped, and continue to shape, how people work, interact, and create in Philadelphia. William Penn, Philadelphia’s founding father, was an immigrant from England. Consequently, the stories of immigrants are essential in the telling of this city’s history. This is represented in our galleries. As you explore our galleries, use this guide to focus on how immigration has contributed to the making of today’s vibrant and ever-changing Philadelphia.

"Tell your Northern Liberties Story"

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I moved to Northern Liberties when I graduated from art school in 1978. I rented the top floor of a four-story factory building at 3rd and Green Streets with one of my fellow sculpture students. We had 2,000 square feet, huge skylights, and a first, no heat. The rest of our building was completely empty – the owners, who had a porno pint shop on the first floor, had moved out. The rest of our block was empty too and we used to tell our friends that we lived at “3rd and Nowhere”.

THE WORLD’S GREATEST WORKSHOP: Work and Labor in Philadelphia

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A 1908 infographic published by the Executive Committee of Founders Week labeled Philadelphia “The World’s Greatest Workshop,” so named for its strong industrial tradition. Since its founding Philadelphia has been shaped by work, whether craft production, manufacturing, or art. As you explore our galleries today, use this guide to focus on how Philadelphians have worked and their legacy of labor.

NEW FACES AT THE MUSEUM

Nellie Hunter spent her summer at Philadelphia History Museum interning under Museum Historian Cindy Little in the Education department. A Philadelphia native, Nellie is a rising junior at the University of Pennsylvania studying American History and Anthropology. Nellie will be helping to lead tours and programs for visiting groups and creating gallery guides highlighting different objects in the collection for holidays such as the Fourth of July and Labor Day.

Over 150 guests attend the 4th Annual Young Friends-hosted Cocktails in the Courtyard Garden Party

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With a wonderful medley of seasonal treats and hors d'oeuvres provided by Brûlée Catering and Dock Street Brewery's always flavorful beer selection, over 150 guests made the most of the 4th Annual Young Friends-hosted Cocktails in the Courtyard Garden Party. The black and white affair thrived with the rocksteady reggae music was provided by local DJ, Jaime Dillon; attendees couldn't help but sway to the beat! The weather was perfect and everyone stayed true to theme, including our co-sponsors, the ladies of The Red Bag Report.

"Tell your Northern Liberties Story"

"Tell your Northern Liberties Story"

I was born January 8, 1947 and took up residence at 913 North 6th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Although I did not know it at that time, the neighborhood into which I was born was then known (as it is now known) as "Northern Liberties." I lived there until I was 8 years old in a large three story brick home (with an outhouse) owned by my grandmother. It was occupied by three families-my grandmother, my mother's sister and her husband and two children; and, my family.

“REBELS & LOYALISTS” PHILADELPHIANS IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: Gallery Guide

As you explore our galleries, use this guide to focus on Philadelphia’s role in the Revolution as the British and the rebelling colonists fought over the city. Philadelphians had to choose whether to side with the patriots, who supported American independence, or the loyalists, or Tories, who wanted the colonies to stay under British rule. Those who remained “non-affiliated,” such as the pacifist Quakers, could still be exiled for their neutrality.

Radio Manufacturer A. Atwater Kent Purchased the House at 239 Arch Street

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In 1937 at the request of Philadelphia Mayor Wilson, radio manufacturer A. Atwater Kent purchased the house at 239 Arch Street, a popular tourist attraction known as the Betsy Ross House, giving it to the City to preserve as part of the nation’s founding history. Today the house and its adjacent lot continue to draw thousands of visitors annually to hear the story, for which no hard evidence exists, of Betsy Ross making the first American flag.

A little History for a Happy Mother's Day

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After her mother’s death in 1905, Philadelphia resident Anna Jarvis began the “Mother’s Day Movement, to honor her mother and all mothers’ love and devotion to family. Her national campaign generated much support in many quarters including retailers and the florist trade who saw it as an opportunity to increase the sale of flowers, cards, and other gift items. As the celebration of Mother’s Day became more commercialized, Jarvis tried unsuccessfully to return it to her original simple vision to honor mothers.